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Showing posts from February, 2011

Bak Kut Teh

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I've been in a quest for the best tasting Bak Kut Teh in the island for a long time now. Unfortunately, right at this point it still remains to be a mission. While I'm yet to accomplish that desire, I've already had a number of servings in some Kopitiams. The very first time I had it, I was instantly reminded of my grandmother's bulalo soup back home. Apparently, hers is not the typical version of Bulalo Filipinos are accustomed to. She usually adds chinese herbs into it. Hence, it was so familiar when I slurped my first try of Bak Kut Teh. The taste is just so similar.

When I attended the Singapore Food Festival last year, Bak Kut Teh was one of the featured dishes of Chinese origin. It was said to mean "meat bone tea". The version that's commonly found in Singapore is of Teochew roots. It's light in color and tends to be peppery. Here's a recipe that was shared with us during the Food Festival via the cook book give away - Culinary Treasures of…

Bak Kut Teh

Image
I've been in a quest for the best tasting Bak Kut Teh in the island for a long time now. Unfortunately, right at this point it still remains to be a mission. While I'm yet to accomplish that desire, I've already had a number of servings in some Kopitiams. The very first time I had it, I was instantly reminded of my grandmother's bulalo soup back home. Apparently, hers is not the typical version of Bulalo Filipinos are accustomed to. She usually adds chinese herbs into it. Hence, it was so familiar when I slurped my first try of Bak Kut Teh. The taste is just so similar.
When I attended the Singapore Food Festival last year, Bak Kut Teh was one of the featured dishes of Chinese origin. It was said to mean "meat bone tea". The version that's commonly found in Singapore is of Teochew roots. It's light in color and tends to be peppery. Here's a recipe that was shared with us during the Food Festival via the cook book give away - Culinary Treasures of…

Shrimps with Spinach & Broccoli

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Going "green and healthy" should be the current mantra in every home. I guess the rationale for doing so need not be elaborated. With the fast-paced lifestyles we all live today, in fact, it's almost beyond necessary. This has been the clamor in the food business anywhere in the world since the increase in rate in the occurence of hypertension, obesity and other unwanted diseases due to poor eating habits, was made known. Hence, it's definitely a good breather if we can have something on the dining table sans the element of guilty pleasure. It's for that reason that this dish came out through our dining table. Think of something that can be prepared as easy as counting one, two and three. Preparing this dish is just as simple as that really. Ingredients: 300 grams medium sized prawns (trimmed) 2 - 3 tbsps minced garlic 1/2 cup oyster sauce dissolved in 1 cup water 2 tbsps olive oil 1 big stalk of broccoli flower (cut into individual florets) 1 pack of spinach (cut into…

Cinnamon Bread Pudding

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It's been a while since a post on home made goodies or a dish recipe has been uploaded here. It's not because I'm no longer cooking at home nor have given up my enthusiasm on it (for that's certainly next to impossibility), but rather current circumstances prevented me from doing so. Hence, I'm glad to be able to share another recipe of one of my favorites again. Actually, this Cinnamon Bread Pudding recipe is not new in this blog. I've already posted it 2 years ago. However, I haven't made it since then much less since we relocated to Singapore. Also, I made some modifications on the recipe for a bigger serving and I used a different kind of bread.
Bread Pudding is usually prepared using stale breads. Personally though, I preferred the ones that are at least 1-2 days old. I don't fancy much the texture of the very old ones. To add more dimensions to the taste, other ingredients maybe added to it such as spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, etc.), flavors (vanilla…

POPIAH

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Meet the "Lumpiang Sariwa" (Fresh Spring Roll) of Singapore, locally known as POPIAH. Sweet, generally tasty and can be made spicy. That's the overall melange of flavors that can be found in this filling yet enjoyable snack item. I usually grabbed a piece of my favorite at Takashimaya's food court. It's a simple food to prepare but its key of acceptability lies heavily on the wrapper and the sauce used. The filling can be as varied as you can imagine. The usual ones are turnips, carrots, garlic, bean sprouts, egg, dried shrimps, fried tofu, chinese sausage, ground peanuts, fried pork and lettuce leaves. Normally, the preferred types of sauces/pastes are first spread onto the wrapper then filled with the necessary fillings. Afterwhich, it's rolled and cut into bite size pieces. I wonder if there are other variations though that can make this spring roll even more enticing. Perhaps, that's something to look forward to in any next taste trek around.

POPIAH

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Meet the "Lumpiang Sariwa" (Fresh Spring Roll) of Singapore, locally known as POPIAH. Sweet, generally tasty and can be made spicy. That's the overall melange of flavors that can be found in this filling yet enjoyable snack item. I usually grabbed a piece of my favorite at Takashimaya's food court. It's a simple food to prepare but its key of acceptability lies heavily on the wrapper and the sauce used. The filling can be as varied as you can imagine. The usual ones are turnips, carrots, garlic, bean sprouts, egg, dried shrimps, fried tofu, chinese sausage, ground peanuts, fried pork and lettuce leaves. Normally, the preferred types of sauces/pastes are first spread onto the wrapper then filled with the necessary fillings. Afterwhich, it's rolled and cut into bite size pieces. I wonder if there are other variations though that can make this spring roll even more enticing. Perhaps, that's something to look forward to in any next taste trek around.

Must See & Do in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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It's good to be back home in SG after the recent festivity. We spent the Chinese New Year vacation in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It was a nice experience to say the least exploring the capital city of the country that's well known for that genuine Asian claim - "Truly Asia". 4 days were actually not enough to explore this throbbing yet still a bit calm, distinctively historical yet fast growing metropolitan.
KL is not very far from Singapore. The usual options to go there is either to travel by land or air. If time is too limited for travel, the 50-minute plane ride is the right choice. For the more budget friendly route, a 5-hour bus ride is also not so bad to take. For the later option, Aeroline is your best bet especially the double decker one. It's very spacious, travels on-time, service is good and the basic necessities (like toilet, individual entertainment screen, reclining seat) are all on board to comfort you during the long travel. It actually felt like ri…

ROJAK

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Sweet, tangy, juicy and a tad sour. These are the flavor elements you can find in the most popular salad around town - Rojak. The name implies "mixture" in malay. It's a blend of fruits and vegetables generously coated with a sweet dressing and drizzled with lots of chopped peanuts. I've been meaning to try this traditional salad for a long time now and finally I had the opportunity to sample a plate at the newly opened Nex shopping centre in Serangoon. Texture wise, it's quite playful in the palate granted that the crunch of the fruits and vegetables are preserved. On the overall taste though, it's way too sweet for me. It's beyond my capacity to consume a plate.